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24999 SE Stark Street Troutdale, Oregon 97060 (888) 479-8942
Base Price (MSRP):$14,145.00 / As Tested (MSRP): $16,660.00
2010 Hyundai Elantra
View The 2010 Hyundai Elantra Specifications
Review by: New Car Test Drive
Great economy, great warranty, great value. 

Model Lineup
The 2010 Hyundai Elantra comes in the four-door sedan and the five-door Touring models, with the sedan available in the Blue version, and both the sedan and Touring available in both GLS and upgraded SE versions . All are powered by a 2.0-liter four-cylinder engine rated at 138 horsepower and 136 pound-feet of torque. Depending upon model, there's a choice of a five-speed manual or four-speed automatic transmission.

Elantra Blue ($14,145) is the fuel economy leader, but is not a stripped version, including as standard equipment power windows and door locks, heated power outside mirrors, remote keyless entry, 12-volt outlets, front-seat active head restraints, 60/40-split fold-down rear seatback, a full complement of airbags and other interior safety features, P195/65R15 tires on steel wheels, and four-wheel anti-lock disc brakes. Optionally available on the Blue is a Comfort Package ($1,700) which includes air conditioning, a 172-watt AM/FM/CD/MP3 audio system with six speakers, and cruise control.

There are numerous dealer-installed accessories, including a rear spoiler ($375), Bluetooth connectivity ($325), floor mats ($95), a cargo tray ($70), and mud guards ($85).

Elantra GLS ($16,895) adds the automatic transmission, air conditioning, tinted windshield, sunvisor with illuminated 2010 Hyundai Elantra passenger vanity mirror, cruise control, fog lamps, and the 172-watt sound system with six speakers. Options for the GLS include a sunroof ($900), and a navigation package ($1,100) which includes navigation, Bluetooth, and steering-wheel audio controls. The GLS can also be fitted with all the dealer-installed accessories available for the Blue version.

The SE ($17,845) is the upgrade model and adds P205/55R16 tires on 16-inch alloy wheels, leather-wrapped shift knob and steering wheel, telescoping steering wheel with audio controls, trip computer, Electronic Stability Control with Traction Control, and brake assist. A Premium Package ($1,150) includes a power sunroof and heated front seats. The Premium Plus Navigation Package ($2,000) is the Premium Package plus navigation and Bluetooth. As with the GLS, all the dealer-installed accessories are also available for the SE.

Cleaner-running PZEV versions (Partial Zero Emissions Vehicle) are sold in California, New York, Massachusetts, Vermont and Maine; they have the automatic transmission and are available in GLS ($16,895) and SE ($17,845) trim.

Elantra Touring GLS ($15,995 with manual, $17,195 with automatic) is equipped similarly to the GLS sedan, except that it includes the Electronic Stability Control with Traction Control. It also includes cupholders in the rear armrest, and the rear seat is split 60/40 and folds down to provide more space for hauling larger items. A Popular Equipment Package ($700) adds telescoping steering wheel, steering wheel-mounted audio controls, trip computer, illuminated ignition, premium cloth interior, driver's seat height and lumbar adjustment, dual illuminated visor vanity mirrors, seatback pockets, cooled glovebox, sliding sunvisors, retractable cargo cover, fog lights, and roof rails.

Elantra Touring SE ($18,995 with manual, $19,745 with automatic) adds a sunroof, P215/45R17 tires on 17-inch alloy wheels, leather-wrapped shift knob and steering wheel, heated front seats, and a B&M racing sport shifter with the manual transmission, plus all the features of the GLS Popular Equipment Package. Both Touring models are also available with numerous dealer-installed accessories.

Safety features on all Elantras include front airbags, front seat-mounted side airbags, roof-mounted side-curtain airbags, seat-belt pretensioners, adjustable head restraints, LATCH (for child safety seats), front active head restraints, and tire-pressure monitoring. All models except the Blue and GLS sedan also include standard Electronic Stability Control (ESC) with Traction Control and Brake Assist; the ESC system is not available with the Blue or GLS sedan model.


Walkaround
The Hyundai Elantra sedan was designed by Americans in Hyundai's California Studio, and is a good-looking compact.

The Elantra received a lot of careful design work, and could almost pass for being seamless. At the front and rear fascias the seams are so tight that the body appears to be one piece, until you look very closely. That quality fitting also reveals itself in the smooth opening and closing of the doors.

The Elantra sedan's good looks move this Korean compact car toward the world of 2010 Hyundai Elantra the stylish. Its sculpture is clean, with a high beltline running along at the body-colored door handles. It has a subtle face, with trapezoidal headlamps having rounded edges, leading down and into the grille with horizontal chrome bars. At the bottom of the fascia is a long, slim air intake. It lacks definitive fender flares because it doesn't need them; the Elantra doesn't shout to be seen. The wheel covers look good from a distance.

The Touring model, even taking into account its five-door configuration, looks much different. At the front, the headlights have a more stylized shape that wraps up and over and around the corners. Below the edge of the hood is a thin opening with the Hyundai emblem in the center, and then below that is a large trapezoidal opening that is flanked by prominent foglamps. At the rear are large, vertical taillamp units that should be easy to see by just about anyone, thus enhancing safety. There are also fairly thick pillars at the rear corners that might inhibit outward vision of some drivers.


Interior Features
The Hyundai Elantra is a large, roomy car, with cabin volume for the sedan measuring 112.1 cubic feet, among the best in the compact class.

Elantra sedans ride on a 104.3-inch wheelbase, while the Touring five-door has a 106.3-inch wheelbase. Not surprisingly, the interior volume of the Touring is larger, at 125.5 cubic feet total, and a generous 65.3 cubic feet with the rear seats folded down.

The front seats are quite comfortable, with good bolstering, and the standard cloth is smooth though unexciting. There's an especially large dead pedal to support the 2010 Hyundai Elantra driver's left foot. The Touring model's seats have a premium cloth.

The blue backlighting of the gauges has a youthful spirit, and arcs of the speedometer and tach are thin blue lines, with red needles pointing the way. The radio control knobs are blessedly simple, like radio knobs should be.

In the rear, there is 35 inches of leg room, along with good hip room. There is also a large trunk. For carrying cargo, the rear seatbacks fold down to allow a pass-through into the trunk.

Storage compartments are abundant. There's a neat box inside the top of the dash, and a sunglasses container in the headliner. The fixed door pockets have built-in bottle holders. Below the three climate control knobs there's a small companion to the glovebox and, below that and forward of the shift lever, there's also an open storage area. There are two cupholders behind that, and a double console under the driver's elbow.

Generally, the interior is notably quiet, for a compact car. While driving on a really, really windy day, there was noticeable wind noise against the windows, but that's to be expected.


Driving Impressions
The Hyundai Elantra offers spirited handling with predictable response and calm confidence. The Elantra rides softer than some of the sportier cars in the class, and the ride is good, although after a couple hours on a bad freeway, the sharp bumps might wear on those who are perhaps more tender. Overall, it's a good fit for someone who just wants good transportation without attitude.

The brakes are excellent. We really used them hard a few times, and they didn't cause the car to dart or weave while they sharply, and evenly, brought 2010 Hyundai Elantra down the speed.

The five-speed manual gearbox worked well. Out on the freeway, 80 miles per hour doesn't feel like 80, which is always a good sign, especially for a compact car. The tachometer showed 3500 rpm at that speed, and it's not in the least bit buzzy. It feels long-legged for such a small car, as if it could cruise cross-country with smoothness and ease.

There's plenty of oomph in the four-cylinder engine, which makes 138 horsepower. Our test model had the five-speed, and the engine revved right up to the redline of 6500 rpm. And, with a sufficient supply of torque, 136 pound-feet, it also accelerates easily at low rpm. We felt that the throttle was perhaps a bit sensitive upon initial acceleration; with the manual transmission, it required a deft touch with the throttle to pull out from a standstill without giving it more gas than it needed.

Fuel economy is 26/35 mpg City/Highway with the manual gearbox Blue model, 26/34 mpg with the automatic. The Touring model, which weighs about 200 pounds more than the sedan, is rated at 23/31 mpg with the manual and 23/30 mpg with the automatic.


Final Word
The Hyundai Elantra offers a roomy interior for the class, a good package of safety equipment, and a strong warranty. The styling holds its own in the class; it looks very clean but doesn't try to draw attention to 2010 Hyundai Elantra itself. The seats are comfortable, the brakes are excellent, and the cornering capability is good, making it enjoyable to drive. The engine offers the latest four-cylinder technology; it can power the Elantra to 80 miles per hour without much effort and delivers good fuel economy when driven conservatively. With a price that's lower than most other compact cars, the Elantra is a worthy competitor in the class and offers a very good value for the money.

Sam Moses contributed to this NewCarTestDrive.com report.

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